Uber Promo Codes: UBERWJD ,$30 Off Coupon

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I took my very first Uber ride in Shanghai. I received a free ride through an Uber promo code (uberwjd), so I figured I would use it since it was free and I needed a ride.

Put another notch in Uber’s bad public relations belt.

The car service app was given an F rating from the Better Business Bureau, the consumer advocacy group announced on Thursday. Over 100 complaints about the company’s surge-pricing strategy, and other issues, lead to the bad review.

“Some consumers claim that they were told the final cost of the transportation service the company provided (through Uber Technologies’ phone app, the driver, and the consumer’s receipt), only to be subsequently charged a substantially larger amount,” the Better Business Bureau said.

Uber’s surge-pricing has been the subject of much criticism in the past. During busy hours, like during a rain storm or on New Year’s Eve, riders are charged at a higher rate. The company says the move helps customers by making more cars available.

“With surge pricing, Uber rates increase to get more cars on the road and ensure reliability during the busiest times,” Uber’s website explains. “When enough cars are on the road, prices go back down to normal levels.”

Uber Promo Code : uberwjd

50% Off Uber Promo Code : uberwjd

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I took my very first Uber ride in Shanghai. I received a free ride through an Uber promo code (uberwjd), so I figured I would use it since it was free and I needed a ride.

Well, my first Uber trip turned out well. He took me directly to home with no problem at all, he was polite, he was friendly, and his Uber car was very nice and clean.

Because of how well my first Uber ride went, I highly recommend their service when you need a ride somewhere and that is why I created this Uber review.

Here are some common questions that you may be wondering right now about Uber:

What is Uber?

Uber is a ridesharing company similar to a taxi company that was founded in 2009. It hasn’t been around for long, but the company is exploding and it seems like everyone is using Uber right now.

How does Uber work?

Uber uses a phone app (I LOVE how easy their app is to use) so that passengers can easily find an Uber car for their next ride.

All you do is open the app on your phone and request a ride. You can then see who will be picking you up, how long will take the driver to get to you, and more. It makes finding a ride very easy.

Is Uber more expensive than a taxi?

For the most part, taking an Uber ride is cheaper than taking a regular taxi. You also don’t have to tip your Uber driver according to Uber’s website (however, I did when I had my Uber ride), which can save you money as well.

However, you do need to watch what kind of Uber car you are taking. UberX will most likely be the cheapest car to take, and taking an UberLUX will be more expensive. This is just like with taking a taxi though. Taxis are cheaper than taking a limo, so the same thought process applies.

What’s this stuff about surge pricing?

Lately, Uber has been getting in trouble with customers with their surge pricing. This is where they might charge 2 or 3 times more than the normal fare price because of busier times. This can make the cost of an Uber ride much higher than a normal taxi.

They usually only do this when it’s super busy, such as you are taking a ride from a busy football game, after a concert, New Year’s Eve, and other busy nights. They do this when there’s not enough cars on the rode so that they can keep up with demand.

However, you are always informed beforehand and you will know about the surge before it’s too late.

Is Uber safe?

Yes, taking an Uber ride is safe!

Uber screens their drivers with a three-step criminal background check. Uber also provides commercial liability insurance so that you are covered during your ride.

 

P.S. 50% Off Uber Promo Code : uberwjd

The world’s 10 best travel apps

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FlightTrack

Follow the path of thousands of international flights on slick, zoomable maps, with detailed information on departure gates, delays and (heaven forbid) cancellations. Great for those anticipating the arrival of loved ones, or particularly nerdy train-spotters looking to up their game.

WeatherPro

An intuitive app offering weather reports for well over two million geographical locations, feeding in everything from cloud formations and atmospheric pressure to wind speed and humidity, all in enough detail to leave Michael Fish clammy-palmed with excitement. It’s also accurate to the point of clairvoyance, so if you’re travelling to Berlin and it predicts rain, pack your best umbrella.

TripAdvisor

Stripping away the glossy magnificence ladled on by just about every online travel agency out there, this is the place to find brutally honest reviews of hotels, restaurants, attractions and more. The user-base is notoriously hard to please, so be warned that you’ll most likely find exclamation mark strewn rants next to your favourite spots. Still, on the flip side, touch down in a strange city with nowhere to stay and you’ll only ever be a few prods away from the warts-and-all opinions of travellers just like you.

Wi-Fi Finder

With data roaming charges still laughably high, knowing where to find a decent wi-fi hotspot is essential if you’re to keep the twitterati up to date with details of your latest sojourn. No need to charge through the city waving your handset around like a fly-swatter, though – simply fire up this handy app and follow directions to your nearest source of wireless internet. Best of all, the offline mode means you can download maps before you go, thereby dodging a massive bill.

Onavo

Anyone who’s ever accidentally downloaded a large email while on holiday will attest to the ridiculousness of data roaming charges, and though there’s no indication from the networks that they’re working on putting things right, there are measures you can take to avoid an end-of-month sting. Once installed, this app drastically reduces the amount of data required to perform everyday tasks, such as retrieving email and posting to Facebook. We’re not entirely sure how it manages such a feat – we just know that it works and we’re not about to complain.

Schemer

Currently in a phase of invite-only beta (have a sniff around forums for a free invite) this is Google’s experimental take on a massive, crowd-sourced travel guide. As tech mash-ups go, it’s fairly straightforward: users leave recommendations for things to do in their city, which visitors can then add to a to-do list and check off as they go. Given the app’s youth, content is fairly sparse outside of the US at the moment, but should you find yourself on a business trip to Chicago with a couple of hours to kill, it’s a reliable

Google Goggles

Stumbled across an important looking building? Want to know more but fear striking up conversation with the locals? Fire up this bad boy, direct your phone’s camera lens at the source of your befuddlement and – as long as what you’re pointing at is famous enough – it’ll return relevant Wikipedia articles filling you in with everything you need to know. After a slow start, recent updates have seen the app’s recognition mechanic and database become really rather impressive, meaning that if it draws a blank, it’s probably just a nice-looking car park.

FourSquare

Though it shot to fame as a social networking tool, this location-based app has become a godsend for curious travellers. The way it works is simple – fire up the app when you arrive at any given place (everything from restaurants to churches are listed) and you’ll see a list of tips from those who’ve been before you (‘try the cheeseburger’, ‘arrive by 9am for a good pew’, etc.). Check in regularly enough and you’ll claim virtual mayorship of that particular venue, with some venues even offering perks (a free pint, discounts, and so on) when you claim the crown.

Time Out city guides

Our apologies for the somewhat self-important trumpet-blowing, but we just couldn’t let you go without a little cheeky reminder about our own fleet of painstakingly researched, expertly written travel apps. There are editions for more than 20 of the world’s biggest cities, each stuffed with comprehensive insights into the finest restaurants, bars, shows and exhibitions on Earth. Best of all, each and every one of these indispensible digital marvels is absolutely free. What can we say – we’ve got big hearts.

Better Translator Pro

The best-rated translation app on Android, and for good reason. More than 50 languages are supported in text-to-text mode, while an impressive 11 work with the app’s voice recognition function. As for accuracy, it’s plugged in to both Google and Bing’s translation services, meaning results are very rarely nonsensical. Don’t expect to be bantering the night away with the natives or anything, but it ought to at least mean the end of ineptly miming ‘ou est la gare?’

Yo! upgrade shows app wasn’t a dumb idea, after all

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The Yo! app that everyone laughed at last year because all it did was flash a Yo! at contacts has come out with an important upgrade. It’s a new location function, said Yo! CEO Or Arbel, and it “opens up a whole world of possibilities for both users and service-providers using the Yo API.”

Yo! attracted a lot of criticism from tech experts – along with a lot of laughs. The app, created by an Israeli team working in San Francisco, sends a “Yo!,” a word akin to “hey there” or “what’s happening,” to contacts. For this app, creators Arbel and Moshe Hogeg got a million dollars in funding. Top blogger Robert Scoble called it “the lamest app around,” apparently speaking for many in the tech community, and Israeli start-up expert Eran Laniado called it a gimmick — and a “goofy” one at that.

Yo! is unique for its single-purpose functionality, but that functionality is nothing new, said Laniado, managing director of Israeli business advisory firm BMN!, which works with dozens of veteran tech companies and start-ups in Israel. “It is similar to Facebook stripped off all of its functions except ‘Poke’,” a function that allows users to let their friends know they are there, without actually sending them a message.”

As such, said Laniado, Yo! was clearly a gimmick but with a little work, it could be much more. “Users lose interest in gimmicks quickly. But if this app decides to be a little more than that, and add, for example, more types of communication (emoticons, text), well — isn’t this what Facebook and WhatsApp are all about?”

The Yo! people took Laniado’s advice – or advice from someone who thinks like him – because the app is now more than it was. With its new update, Yo! becomes much more functional, Arbel insists. The location function is available as an API for iOS 8, the new operating system announced by Apple last month, so developers can create versions of the app for specific needs.

“Service providers can now offer their users one-tap location-based solutions to their customers’ needs,” the company said. “Want to know if it’s going to rain where you are? ‘Yo’ a weather service! Want a cab to pick you up? ‘Yo’ a taxi service! It’s that simple – and the applications are limitless.”

Versions of these apps are already available on the Yo Index site. With YoYouTube, for example, users can get a Yo! notification when channels they subscribe to are updated. YoMyPackage tells you where a FedEx or US Post Office package is at the moment when you send a Yo! and your package tracking number. Send out a Yo! with the StarbucksMap app and it will respond with the location of the nearest coffee shop in the chain. There’s even one that will return the latest updates about the Kardashian clan, that favorite of gossip magazines and TV shows, if you shoot it a Yo!

And this is just the beginning, said Arbel. “I can’t wait to see where our users take this. I’m sure our platform and API will give Yo users real solutions – without having to compromise on simplicity.”

IFTTT to add a new channel for the Revolv smart home hub

Adding to it’s steadily-growing list of connected home devices, the popular web-based automation service If This Then That (IFTTT) is reportedly on the cusp of releasing a new channel for the Revolv smart home hub — a move that will greatly expand the possibilities of both Revolv and IFTTT.

For the uninitiated, IFTTT allows you to connect physical devices (things like lights, your phone, or even your car) to digital services like email, social media, and various other webapps. It also lets you connect physical devices to other physical devices via the Internet, so you can do nifty things like automatically turn on a lamp when your WeMo motion detector senses movement, or have your connected air conditioner flip on when you open a door.

Revolv performs a similar function. The hub boasts seven different radios under its hood and can therefore understand practically every major home automation protocol in the biz. This makes it possible for users to link otherwise incompatible smart devices together (a Z-Wave light bulb and a Bluetooth door lock, for example) and control them all from one centralized location.

Therefore, while IFTTT’s new Revolv channel is technically just for one device, it will presumably act as a gateway for hundreds of different gizmos that aren’t directly supported by IFTTT. In other words, although IFTTT doesn’t have a dedicated Sonos channel, you’ll be able to use the Revolv channel to link your Sonos speakers to, say, your Facebook account or favorite RSS feed. This new channel will essentially fling the doors of possibility wide open for both platforms.

Revolv tells us the IFTTT integration is set to go live before the end of the month.